How to Manage a Prostate Cancer “Watchful Waiting” Strategy

Observation as Good as Surgery for Some Men with Prostate Cancer?
The controversy over treatment versus “watchful waiting” for prostate cancer patients seems never ending.

The National Cancer Institute just released an article in it’s July 24, 2012 NCI Cancer Bulletin showing that a 10 year old study of 731 with localized and early-stage prostate cancer showed roughly the same survival rate over a 10-year period. These men had a median age of 67.

While I’m not a doctor, I am a 10-year prostate cancer survivor whose research shows that almost every prostate cancer survivor lives at least 5 years, regardless of the stage of diagnosis.

However, the 10-year survival rate for men diagnosed when their prostate cancer already had metastasized is just 34%. In my mind, the prostate cancer conversation needs to move from treatment options to early detection and from early detection to prevention.

The PCAP Prostate Cancer Manifesto
We believe that every man has the right to know that he has prostate cancer while his prostate cancer is still fully treatable.

The PCAP Contribution to Early Detection
Effective prostate cancer treatment means early detection and the best test at present is the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test.

We believe men should begin testing at age 35 and have an annual test, just as women do with the PAP test for cervical cancer and their annual breast exams.

The PCAP has created a simple tool for detecting any rising trend in a man’s PSA test number, which is highly correlated with prostate cancer presence. This tool is available at http://ProstateTracker.org.

ProstateTracker is free to everyone. It does not collect user names so absolute privacy is assured. ProstateTracker visually displays any rising PSA trend. Users can print their PSA history and take it with them to their annual physical with their doctor.

Why Men Need to Track their PSA

  1. There are more new cases of prostate cancer each year than breast cancer
  2. Almost 30,000 men die each year from prostate cancer in the US alone
  3. Prostate cancer usually shows no symptoms until it is advanced
  4. A rising PSA trend is a reliable indicator that something unusual is taking place with a man’s prostate gland
  5. Prostate cancer is very treatable, but ONLY IF DETECTED EARLY
  6. Not all doctor’s track a man’s PSA over time
  7. Metatastic prostate cancer is a very unpleasant way to die

How to Make Certain You Don’t Have a Surprise Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

❑        Begin annual PSA testing at age 35
❑        Track the results in ProstateTracker
❑        Discuss any rising trend with your doctor or health care services provider immediately
❑        Carefully discuss any treatment program with your doctor

What you Need to Do Today – Right Now – Right at This Moment!

❑        Go to http://ProstateTracker.org and create your account
❑        Input your past four annual PSA results (or as many as you have)
❑        See if the trend is rising
❑        If it is, go to your doctor immediately

Your free and anonymous prostate cancer early detection system. Create your account today!

About Success Architect

Founder, CEO of TSG Inc | Founder and Partner of InterSpaceLA | Best Selling Author | Speaker | Senior Fellow @ the Center for the Digital Future USC Annenberg School |Business Coach | Thought Partner | LinkedIn Trainer and Coach | Founder of Pony Express Riders | Motorcycle Rider | Bicycle Racer | USA Cycling Coach | Retired career Army officer | Prostate Cancer Advocate | Founder and CEO of Prostate Cancer Awareness Project, Inc. | Find me at LinkedIn.com/in/robertwarrenhess.
This entry was posted in Detection, Diagnostic tools, ProstateTracker.org, PSA testing and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to How to Manage a Prostate Cancer “Watchful Waiting” Strategy

  1. Pingback: Breast Cancer Recovery

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